Rio Grande 2014 Tools and Equipment Catalog - page 462

WELDING METHODS:
Laser Welding
Laser welds join similar or dissimilar metals quickly and permanently,
creating exceptionally strong bonds. The laser weld is made by melting
two metals simultaneously at the welding point, causing the metals to
blend together and fuse in place. To do this, laser welders generate a
beam of light so intense that it instantly heats the metals to their melting
point at the weld site.
The heat from the beam remains completely localized at the site, leaving
adjacent metal, gemstones or other materials virtually unaffected. The
area affected by the heat is referred to as the “heat-affected zone” (HAZ);
laser welders have the smallest HAZ of any welding or soldering
technology (except fusion welding) and by far the most versatility
in the work they can accomplish.
Because physical contact with the workpiece isn’t required, the laser
can reach into crevices where an electrode cannot. To prevent oxidation
of the metal during the process, many laser welders flood the welding
area with a shield of inert gas that pushes oxygen away from the weld
site just prior to and during the firing of the laser.
See PulsePoint™ laser welders on pages 463–466.
Arc Welding
Arc welds join similar or dissimilar metals quickly and permanently. An
arc weld is achieved by instantly melting two metals at a welding point,
causing the metals to blend together, fusing them in place. Arc welders
take electricity into a capacitor and discharge it through an electrode.
A charged clip attaches to the workpiece; the electrode is handheld or
seated in a holder while the workpiece is guided to the point of contact.
For this method to be effective, the workpiece must be in contact with the
charged clip in order to complete the electrical circuit and create the ‘arc.’
The welding action occurs when the electrode, made of tungsten,
is brought into contact with the workpiece at the weld site.
To prevent oxidation of the metal during the process, many arc welders
protect the welding area with a shield of inert gas that clears oxygen away
from the immediate weld site during the electrical discharge.
See the Orion and PUK arc welders on pages 468–470.
Fusion Welding
Fusion welds join specially made findings with jewelry pieces made with
like or dissimilar metals. Fusion findings feature a nib of metal at the point
of contact that is melted and fused to the jewelry piece in the fusion
process. These welds are permanent, and each finding can be used only
once. These welders use electricity to charge a capacitor and quickly
discharge the capacitor through the nib positioned at the point of the
weld as it is driven against the jewelry piece.
Fusion welding is ideal for ear posts, brooches and tie tacs, or any design
that incorporates findings that require precise, repeatable positioning.
See the PIN module from PUK on page 470.
Tack Welding
Tack welds join similar or dissimilar metals temporarily, holding them
securely in place until a soldering or welding step makes the weld
permanent. The tack weld bond is created by bringing the surfaces
of two pieces of metal to the point of melting, allowing them to stick
together, but short of the point where the metals themselves actually
mingle and fuse. Tack welders use electricity to charge a capacitor and
quickly discharge the capacitor through electrodes positioned at the
point of the weld.
Tack welding is perfect for multipart soldering jobs; the tack makes it
possible to avoid using solders of several different temperatures while still
ensuring that each part is precisely positioned on the workpiece relative
to every other part before the final welds are made.
See the Orion welders on pages 468 and 469.
THE LANGUAGE OF WELDING
welding
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